Tech

How LED Lighting IS Revolutionising Street Lighting

LED stands for lighting emitting diode. LEDs are used in a lot of electronic products which includes the main topic I will be talking about today, street lighting. Street lighting technology has made use of LEDs since the 1960s. Prior to that the semi-conducting light source was used almost exclusively for products such as lamp indicators in electronic equipment. In recent years LED technology had increased considerably and the efficiency of this type of light emitter is far superior to the older semi conductor light source. As a result LED technology is now becoming common within new street lighting systems.

LEDs have excellent colour quality and are very, very reliable best led grow lights for sale of 2022 . As the technology has improved, the cost of the LED bulbs has reduced year by year until a point was reached recently where using LEDs above all other light sources within street lighting has become economically viable.

The main advantage of using LEDs is they have a very low watt percentage which obviously makes them very efficient. The cost of running lighting that uses LEDs instead of traditional bulb lighting is much cheaper.

As I said before, LED lighting is preferable because of their excellent colour clarity and reliability and efficiency. Previously LED lighting has been used for marking landmarks and for decorational purposes. The amount of light omitted was generally not enough to make them suitable for street lighting. However as technology has improved it is now possible to set up LED lighting systems in a way that they emit a significant amount of light and so have become good at illuminating things and not just acting as visual markers. These consisted of being used for external lighting but now they are considered good enough to light our streets.

Boaters are an inventive and industrious group. With the high costs of owning and operating a sea going vessel, they have to be. Aside from normal maintenance, boaters spend a great deal of time performing their own upgrades and modifications, in most cases in an effort to improve the efficiency, durability, and safety of their vessels. Particularly when it comes to managing power, boaters will find all sorts of interesting ways to reduce their amp use and make the most of the power they produce onboard. Whether it’s adapting a land based solar array to marine use, or stripping the guts out of an LED walkway light to create a makeshift anchor light, boaters will usually find a way if something looks possible. Although this kind of creativity and innovation has resulted in a lot of interesting and effective results, sometimes it is a good idea to see if the effort is really actually worth it. In the case of adapting LEDs to your vessel, this can be especially true.

About ten or so years ago when LEDs really began gaining attention due to new designs being able to provide better than meager light output, boaters began noticing how efficiently the LEDs produced light. On a boat, particularly smaller vessels with limited power generation and storage capabilities, managing power use can be a major affair, and lighting all too often ends up falling victim to compromise and rationing as a result. On a boat carrying only 600 or so amp hours worth of power storage, the last thing you want to be doing is running a set of spreader lights for several hours, and you can pretty well forget illuminating the whole cabin for an entire night. That is unless you don’t mind running a noisy and fuel hungry generator repeatedly. Since there are other devices like radios, stereos, radar, live wells, and even refrigerators and ac units being used, lighting is usually considered an extra that can be work around using flashlights, battery powered lanterns, and similar temporary light sources, in order to save power for more important equipment.

While rationing is OK and effective, it takes a lot away from the enjoyment and convenience of using your onboard lighting systems the way they were meant to be used. Think about it, would the spouse be happier being able to spend time below decks catching up on a good book for a few hours under the light of a well illuminated cabin, or would they rather try reading by the light of a candle or cheap lantern? This is the sort of thing which has led many boaters to consider upgrading their onboard lighting systems. Since options for improving onboard lighting are limited, the introduction of LEDs has become quite popular with boaters due to their very high efficiency and long life. A typical halogen cabin light pulling about 25 watts and 2.5 amps will produce about 425 lumens of light output, while an LED light of about 8 watts pulling less than an amp can produce the same amount of light. Clearly the LED holds a significant advantage in the efficiency department.

When LEDs were first getting noticed by boaters, the available aftermarket LED boat lights were far and few between. With few options, boaters began experimenting with retrofitting LEDs into their existing fixtures. While this was a good idea, the unique characteristics of LEDs and their then still moderate power and light quality made it a hit or miss prospect. Boaters were finding the light from LEDs too cold in appearance, poorly distributed, and output below their expectations. Making matters worse, the voltage sensitivity of LEDs meant it was often necessary to add resistors into the wiring circuit in order to prevent voltage spikes and fluctuations from causing premature failure and poor performance. A final problem boaters encountered with this do it yourself approach involved the directional nature of LEDs and the basic design of the fixtures they attempted to retrofit them into. Unlike incandescent bulbs which radiate their light over their entire surface, LEDs produce light over the top of their surface, resulting in a much tighter beam spread. Fixtures designed for incandescent bulbs just were not effective at distributing the light from LEDs well, resulting in fixtures that while fairly bright, did not spread light very far or evenly.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *